A Whale of a Time: Farallon Island Log

As we float in shark alley, the wildlife biologists on the island make their own recordings of seabirds, seals, shark attacks and human visitation. Finally, it is time to head back to the mainland, and reeling in the decoy, we are delighted by a goodbye view of a white shark passing beneath unseen but for the video, to be enjoyed on the monitor afterwards and here.

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New Guide to Species Proposals at CITES

This year delegates and scientists will convene to consider increasing international trade protection for hundreds of species of plants and animals under CITES, a multilateral treaty to protect endangered plants and animals from the threats of international trade. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) entered into force in 1975, and became the only treaty to ensure that international trade in plants and animals does not threaten their survival in the wild. A State or country that has agreed to implement the Convention is called a Party to CITES. Currently there are 184 Parties, including 183 member countries and the European Union.

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History of Human Occupation on the Farallon islands

Looking west on a clear San Francisco day a smudge of jagged peaks can be glimpsed on edge of the horizon. A rugged archipelago of wind and wave-worn rocks form the Farallon Island chain. Located 30 miles from shore, Farallones composed of SE Farallones (the tallest), Middle Rock, the Island of St James to the North, and Noon Day rock, the islands host a history of shipwreck, murder and the birth of millions of seabirds and seals. Known as the islands of the Dead by the native Miwok, who viewed them but did not leave any evidence of visitation, the islands have a rich and sometimes tragic history of human occupation.

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Sharks the Invisible Casualty in San Francisco Bay Fish Kill

In August, thousands of dead fish washed ashore in San Mateo County, from Foster City to Coyote Point. The reports later spread into the main San Francisco Bay past Hayward and Alameda Island, to Fort Baker in Sausalito. Crossing the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to investigate the report near San Quentin, my polarized sunglasses showed a distinctly dark swath of water along the tideline stretching from Richmond to the Larkspur channel.

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The Islands of the Dead: Exploring the Farallon Islands

Located close to San Francisco, one of the world’s most recognizable metropolises, there is a series of desolate, fog shrouded, wind and wave-sculpted islands. Known as the “Islands of the Dead” by the Native Miwok, and the “Devil’s Teeth” by Spanish mariners, these islands have a fascinating history of human exploitation, killing and loss.

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