Shark Bites San Diego Swimmer, 8th in California in 2022

On November 4 at around 10 Am, an ocean swimmer was bitten in the thigh by what is believed to be a juvenile white shark (aka great white sharks Carcharodon carcharias) off the coast of Del Mar in San Diego County.
This is the 8th confirmed incident in California in 2022 between San Diego and Humboldt Counties

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Trip Report: Devil’s Teeth and Ducking Whales

Humpback whales steam among the fish, spouts blowing in the wind as they forage in the waves. We find the whales often feeding in or close to the shipping lane. Each year as many as 200,000 ships enter and exit the Golden Gate, and according to the Point Blue Conservation Science as many as 83 humpback, blue and fin whales are killed by ships on the West Coast each year.

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A Whale of a Time: Farallon Island Log

As we float in shark alley, the wildlife biologists on the island make their own recordings of seabirds, seals, shark attacks and human visitation. Finally, it is time to head back to the mainland, and reeling in the decoy, we are delighted by a goodbye view of a white shark passing beneath unseen but for the video, to be enjoyed on the monitor afterwards and here.

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New Guide to Species Proposals at CITES

This year delegates and scientists will convene to consider increasing international trade protection for hundreds of species of plants and animals under CITES, a multilateral treaty to protect endangered plants and animals from the threats of international trade. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) entered into force in 1975, and became the only treaty to ensure that international trade in plants and animals does not threaten their survival in the wild. A State or country that has agreed to implement the Convention is called a Party to CITES. Currently there are 184 Parties, including 183 member countries and the European Union.

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History of Human Occupation on the Farallon islands

Looking west on a clear San Francisco day a smudge of jagged peaks can be glimpsed on edge of the horizon. A rugged archipelago of wind and wave-worn rocks form the Farallon Island chain. Located 30 miles from shore, Farallones composed of SE Farallones (the tallest), Middle Rock, the Island of St James to the North, and Noon Day rock, the islands host a history of shipwreck, murder and the birth of millions of seabirds and seals. Known as the islands of the Dead by the native Miwok, who viewed them but did not leave any evidence of visitation, the islands have a rich and sometimes tragic history of human occupation.

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