Conservation of sharks: safeguarding the apex predators of the ocean

The conservation of sharks is not just about saving a single species; it is about preserving the entire marine ecosystem. By recognizing the intrinsic value of sharks and taking action to protect them, we can secure a future where these fascinating creatures continue to roam the oceans for generations to come, and even keep the oceans a healthier place.

Read More

More Sharks Killed Despite Finning Laws

A new study reports that 76 to 80 million sharks  were killed between 2012 and 2019, with about 25 million of them threatened species. The study published by Worm et al in the journal Science shows that overfishing continues to present a dire threat to shark populations over much of the world, despite the widespread adoption of anti-shark finning legislation and related regulations over the same period.

Read More

Saving Endangered Sharks Through Science, Art, and Community Action

overfished by fisheries around the world, primarily for the fins. Once abundant, oceanic whitetip (OWT) sharks have been depleted on a global scale. International demand for shark fins is the major force behind OWT shark mortality. The fins are exported from around the globe to Asia, particularly China, for use in shark fin soup. 

Read More

Saving Endangered Sharks Through Art, and Community Action

November News Ecotourism in La Paz, and at nearby Cabo Pulmo are examples of how dive-ecotourism can support conservation and marine protection. Our goal is to extend this up into the Gulf, connecting protected places with a no fishing migratory pathway. Follow us on this exciting partnership and endeavor to save endangered sharks at of the world’s great shark Hope Spots! 

Read More

The Giant Fish With a Skelton Like a Shark

Crossing the Gulf of the Farallones is always an eventful experience. Currents and tides aggregate plankton and planktivorous (plankton-eating) fish, which in turn attract harbor porpoises, seabirds and humpback whales. The rich seawater upwelled from the deep waters, feeds a proliferation of plankton, attracting marine life from across the Pacific into the Sanctuary waters. One of the most unusual fish is the giant ocean sunfish.

Read More