The Giant Fish With a Skelton Like a Shark

Crossing the Gulf of the Farallones is always an eventful experience. Currents and tides aggregate plankton and planktivorous (plankton-eating) fish, which in turn attract harbor porpoises, seabirds and humpback whales. The rich seawater upwelled from the deep waters, feeds a proliferation of plankton, attracting marine life from across the Pacific into the Sanctuary waters. One of the most unusual fish is the giant ocean sunfish.

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Sharktober 2023 News and Events

Sharktober is a celebration of white sharks to our Sanctuary offshore, and to educate and motivate the public to save endangered sharks and rays. Our first Sharktoberfest events were intended to drive support for the now successful California Shark Fin Ban introduced by Shark Stewards, and the USA shark fin trade ban passed in 2022.  Since that time we have used these events with our partners at the California Academy of Sciences, the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, the California Ocean Protection Council and other NGOS and agencies to reach over 100,000 public and youth directly in the Bay Area and beyond to celebrate and save sharks. Join us for our 15th year celebrating and saving sharks!

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Shark Diving Tourism: Good or Bad?

Shark-diving tourism can be a controversial issue. Images of svelte, swimming females fending off assertive tiger sharks, armored divers hand -feeding bull sharks for tourists, and shots of white sharks slamming into cages: these scenes are not aways favorable for the average diver, or even the sharks.

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History of Human Occupation on the Farallon islands

Looking west on a clear San Francisco day a smudge of jagged peaks can be glimpsed on edge of the horizon. A rugged archipelago of wind and wave-worn rocks form the Farallon Island chain. Located 30 miles from shore, Farallones composed of SE Farallones (the tallest), Middle Rock, the Island of St James to the North, and Noon Day rock, the islands host a history of shipwreck, murder and the birth of millions of seabirds and seals. Known as the islands of the Dead by the native Miwok, who viewed them but did not leave any evidence of visitation, the islands have a rich and sometimes tragic history of human occupation.

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